(Try & Die) > (Same & Lame)

Are you afraid to explore? Scared of experimentation? Do you constantly weigh the consequences of something new? Is your manager's input too risky to try? Is the rep in the territory next to yours always doing "crazy" stuff? Is your excuse that "you have tried that before" or "you already know that" really a way to stay away from something different?

I "died" during the race, but the experiment I tried taught me a lot. I'd rather be where I am now, having failed, then be where I was, ignorant of where the "path" would lead.

I "died" during the race, but the experiment I tried taught me a lot. I'd rather be where I am now, having failed, then be where I was, ignorant of where the "path" would lead.

Tough questions. Only being totally truthful will allow you to change where you are at. Change requires a catalyst. We all desire predictability and security, but the only way to figure out what is safe, predictable, and secure is to experiment. Experimentation is the catalyst you need.

This week's posts are about what I learned during my failed experiment at the Mud on the Mountain race. I "died" during the race, but the experiment I tried taught me a lot. I'd rather be where I am now, having tried and failed, then be where I was, on my couch and ignorant of where the path would lead.

Here's the thing:  to kick ass at sales, you have to be willing to get uncomfortable. With your technique, with your networking, with your thinking, with your sales "experiments," with new process, etc. Are you willing to do the sales equivalent of running a race in 30 degree weather in 1 foot of snow, covered in mud, wading through waist-deep water? 

You need to think I would rather die trying than stay where I am. Being same is lame. Lame in terms of stupid and unoriginal, but also lame in terms of crippled. If you "stay on the couch" rather than try something new, your sales career will be crippled. 

I'm not endorsing being stupid. And, honestly, I think it is ridiculous I even have to make that disclaimer. The fact I feel like I need to even type that statement so someone doesn't think I am endorsing irresponsible action and, consquently, decides to write off this entire post reveals how much I have encountered the overall resistance out there to the Try and Die Attitude. 

Even if your "same" has made you a top performer, eventually, the results of someone else's "try" will give them an edge. So, try a new voicemail script. Invent a new leave-behind. Have someone help you draft a new appointment-getting email. Purpose to not do the same ol' sales presentation you have always done. Go to an event you have been avoiding. At the very least, try running a race up a mountain in the freezing cold soaked in muddy water while wearing shorts!

Try and Die is better than Same and Lame. 

If you want something new, you have to stop doing something old.
— Peter F. Drucker